Common Health Problems Seniors Face

Even people in excellent health condition can deal with health issues while aging. These common health problems seniors face range in severity. Learning about the early warning signs for certain health conditions can help you prevent or delay them. Maximize your quality of life by adequately protecting yourself and your body with healthy lifestyle choices. Simple life adjustments can make a huge difference to your overall well-being.

Respiratory Diseases

As we age, our respiratory system becomes more susceptible to disease. Many lifestyle habits can exacerbate or expedite the development of respiratory diseases in the body. The risk of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increases as we get older. Fortunately, there are many medications available to treat symptoms of respiratory disease.

Osteoporosis or Osteoarthritis

Osteoporosis and osteoarthritis cause discomfort in joints, as bones and cartilage in the body start to lose density. Though they are common health problems seniors face, there are misconceptions about osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. A healthy diet and regular exercise can help protect your joints at any age.

Heart Disease

For adults over the age of 65, heart disease is the leading cause of death. Cardiovascular problems like high blood pressure and chronic stress can lead to heart disease if left untreated. You can maintain good heart health by staying active and finding healthy ways to cope with stress.

Loss of Vision or Hearing

Millions of older adults suffer from age-related eyesight issues such as cataracts and glaucoma. Noise pollution can have detrimental effects on our hearing capabilities as we age, too. You should get routine screenings for both your eyes and ears to measure any regression.

Oral Health Issues

Ensure you have healthy, strong teeth by keeping up with dentist appointments. Poor oral health leads to bacterial infections that negatively impact teeth and gums. Seniors often experience tooth decay or receding gums with age.

Cognitive Decline

Minor cognitive impairments such as memory loss are not rare with older age. Severe cognitive diseases can hinder memory, language, and judgment to a considerable degree.

If your family’s medical history includes dementia, you can receive genetic testing. Screenings indicate whether individuals have the genetic mutation responsible for the cognitive disease.

Alzheimer’s is a well-known disease; its progression results in severe memory loss and damage to other cognitive functions. Recognizing the warning signs of Alzheimer’s can play a critical role in early intervention and treatment to slow its development.

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