How to stop the falling out of Family?

Share this in Social MediaShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someoneShare on TumblrDigg thisShare on Reddit

I will start with saying one highly important thing. Your baby shouldn’t sleep in your bed until he/she is a half year old, at least. The amount of SIDS-the sudden infant death syndrome happens in 80% when the baby is sleeping in the same bed as the parents. I am pedagogue with 5 years of experience working with the babies from one month and with the children until the age of adult. Okay, let us discuss some situations.

b2You need to surround your baby with those pillows. In that case, the baby cannot turn itself on the stomach, and that is also the precaution of the sudden infant death syndrome. You should always check your floors, and see if anything sharp or dangerous lies there. This is in the case that you’ve already experienced the fall of the baby to the floor, or you just want to be safer if my first advice hasn’t given you much trust.

Also, never leave the baby with the toys in the bed, because it’s the sleeping time-or nap time. It’s not a play time. Those toys can be also dangerous and can cause the SIDS if the baby puts them in the mouth. That can cause difficulty with breathing and asphyxia, which can also lead to that horrible thing I talked about. It is the 21st century, and there are a lot of things which can help the new parents and make their parenting easier and decrease the amount of worrying. For an example-a baby monitor. In that case, you can always hear and see what is your baby doing and if it’s safe and protected from anything dangerous that can happen.

b1Some people don’t assume co-sleeping if you’re not on the bed, and that is okay. But I want to make all of the situations clear. If you’re in the group of people who consider that the only co-sleeping with a baby is night sleeping or the afternoon nap, while you’re both in the same bed (or there are three of you, the daddy, too), then you should check out these tips for better safety of your infant. If you have any problems with sleeping-it may be nightmares or sleep apnea, or you don’t know what you’re doing at night-maybe you have some strong movements with your hands or legs, then you should definitely need to escape the co-sleeping.

Just don’t even try. Also, if you have any issues with any kind of addiction-for an example alcohol, or you’re taking sedatives, co-sleeping isn’t for you. Okay, if you’re none of the above, and still want your baby to sleep in the same bed as you two, then consider the next advice. Never keep the blankets in the bed which baby can easily pull over its face. It can easily cause the same difficulties with the breathing I was talking about. Let the baby always be in the middle of you and your partner. You two will keep the baby warm enough, no need for extra blankets.

Parents with newborn baby at home --- Image by © Mareen Fischinger/Corbis

Yes, don’t listen to your grandma, the baby is not cold. If you have more kids, and especially if they’re older than the baby, don’t let them sleep beside one another. You need to put the baby in the middle of you and your partner, and the older child may sleep beside any of you. But, it would be better that you don’t sleep with more children. I cannot even imagine a huge bed like that. Sorry, for the little humor, I just wanted to take your thoughts out of the term SIDS I was talking about.

As a mom, I know how frightening it sounds. If you don’t regularly sleep with your baby, but want to do it sometimes, then don’t do it. You don’t know well enough your sleep behaviors and also your babies. You don’t know how would the baby react to it. It is true that it is healthy for the baby to be near its mother because in that case, it can regulate the body temperature easier and of course feel safer. This is good for long term development of your child. But, I would really not recommend it until the baby is at least 6 months old.

I hope my advice help you!

 

Leave a Reply

  • (not be published)